BriefCatch Blog

Writing Tips & Legal Writing Articles

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Winter-Spring 2021: Part-Time Paid Internships at Legal Writing Pro and BriefCatch

By Ross Guberman / December 29, 2020 /

These paid internships are for law students and recent graduates with a strong interest and exceptional skills in legal writing, research, and legal tech. Projects will include these and others: Research and writing related to completing new editions of Point Made and Point Taken Testing legal documents using BriefCatch Creating and formatting e-learning on legal…

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The Drafter’s Dilemma: “The Greatest of Me, Myself, AND I”? “The Greatest of Me, Myself, OR I”?

By Ross Guberman / December 29, 2020 /

Would you put “and” or “or” in the blank here? How much do you care? And how much would you bet that you’re right? DoorDash’s S-1 statement: “We would cease to be an emerging growth company UPON THE EARLIEST to occur OF: (i) the last day . . . (ii) the date we . .…

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Slasher Fiction? The Federal Circuit Breathes New Life Into the Slash

By Ross Guberman / December 28, 2020 /

To paraphrase Bill Clinton, can an ingredient in a patented drug depend on what the meaning of a slash is? The Problem Bracco Diagnostics patented a formulation for sincalide, a drug used to diagnose disorders of the gall bladder and pancreas. It later sued Maia Pharmaceuticals for infringing the patent. Bracco prevailed at the district…

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If the Judges of Yesteryear Were As Hip As Judges Today . . . .

By Ross Guberman / December 10, 2020 /

Today’s judges pepper their opinions with nods to Marie Kondo, Breaking Bad, Bob Dylan, and Dr. Seuss. Were the old-timers missing a populist touch? You be the judge. I did some pop-culture research to predict how three great opinions might have read differently. Marbury v. Madison (1803) Just as Johnny Appleseed has the last word…

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The Court of Chancery “Edits” a Material Adverse Effect Definition That’s “Obviously Wordy and Full of Synonyms”

By Ross Guberman / December 5, 2020 /

In the holiday spirt, the Vice Chancellor Laster just sent contract drafters a gift: His new blockbuster COVID-related decision “edits” the Material Adverse Effect definition driving the M&A dispute. Here’s the original, the court’s discussion, a redline, and a revised version. Do you agree that the language the Court of Chancery suggests cutting is “obviously…

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